Monthly Archives: October 2015

Carnegie Mellon University & Media Updates

By Carlino Giampolo
October 27, 2015

On October 1, 2015 I emailed Carnegie Mellon University President Subra Suresh requesting that he provide the Panther Hollow community the following: the dates of all meetings he attended concerning a proposed roadway corridor through city-owned property in Panther Hollow to connect Oakland to the Almono site in Hazelwood; the names of those present at the meetings; the locations of all meetings; his first knowledge of the Multimodal Transportation Fund Grant application; and his first knowledge of the proposed road corridor. I received no response.

On October 12, I walked in front of the President’s office building with a sign reading:

Save Panther Hollow One of Pittsburgh's First Italian Neighborhoods www.SavePantherHollow.comSave Panther Hollow
One of Pittsburgh’s First Italian Neighborhoods
www.SavePantherHollow.com

On October 15 I received an email from the Associate Dean of Student Affairs stating, “While CMU has not officially endorsed any specific plan for transit through the Hollow, the potential for this link to enhance economic development and job creation is compelling.” This sentiment indicates that human dignity is not the highest priority of the University.

The response ignored the wishes of Panther Hollow residents who want their neighborhood protected and preserved. One of these residents is an 85-year-old widow who recently had a pacemaker implant operation, and whose health has been adversely affected as she faces the dread of losing her home and the destruction of her neighborhood. Another resident is a widow whose husband passed away one month ago and is completely overwhelmed with grief. Yet another resident is an 80-year-old widow whose father arrived in Panther Hollow over 100 years ago, who raised her family there, and who wishes to live the remainder of her years in a neighborhood she dearly loves. Each longtime resident of Panther Hollow has his or her own story, but even if there were no residents, the neighborhood must be preserved for what it represents to the culture and history of Pittsburgh.

The associate dean’s response is also indicative of a destructive consciousness that, though old, the University perpetuates. President Suresh was a student in his home country of India when Pitt Chancellor Edward Litchfield attempted to destroy Panther Hollow in the 1970s in order that Pitt might build massive research facilities. The chancellor used the same rhetoric as President Suresh uses today to justify the destruction, claiming it necessary for economic development and job creation. This old way of thinking must change.

My response to the email was to reiterate my request for information from President Suresh. A second email from the associate dean stated, “I regret that we will not be able to accommodate your request. Detailed information related to the calendar and activities of Dr. Suresh, as president of a private university, is not made available to the public.” A leader of a university who makes plans to destroy a neighborhood and then refuses to answer questions is not the kind of leadership that our community or the City of Pittsburgh needs or wants. Another protest took place on October 23 in front of the CMU campus with a sign stating “Suresh Must Resign.”

SURESH MUST RESIGN Save Panther Hollow One of Pittsburgh's First Italian Neighborhoods www.SavePantherHollow.com

Our community is very grateful for the October 11 article in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette informing us of the proposed corridor and the accompanying letter to the editor. But why have all the other local media organizations remained silent? Fifteen letters to various city officials and other collaborators have gone unanswered. This should be a clear indication to the media that there is more to this issue than what is already known, and that there may be additional wrongdoing. That silence weakens residents’ trust of their city and local media.

Pittsburgh residents deserve that their media leaders adhere to the highest standards of integrity and want answers to the following questions:

1) Who was involved in writing the 75-page $3 million Multimodal Transportation Fund Grant application? When and where was it composed?

2) How many meetings were held to gather material for the grant application? Where did the meetings take place and who attended?

3) The Urban Redevelopment Authority’s Acting Executive Director Robert Rubinstein signed the application. How many meetings did he attend in the preparation of the application? Who else from the URA attended these meetings?

4) The application stated, “This project will be a public-private partnership between the City of Pittsburgh, the Urban Redevelopment Authority, the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University. The land for this project is owned by the City of Pittsburgh. The Urban Redevelopment Authority will execute the construction of the project and the operator of the shuttle will be a shared entity that includes the universities and large employers.” Is there a written legal agreement between these four entities? Who claimed that this collaborative relationship exists?

5) The University of Pittsburgh’s Vice Chancellor for Community and Governmental Relations contradicted the above assertion when he wrote in an October 2 email, “As he has had no involvement, Chancellor Gallagher asked that I respond to your email to him. The University has not been involved in any discussions about the proposed roadway.” Were there any other University administrators that assured city officials and the URA that Pitt would be a part of this partnership?

6) The application was submitted on July 31. Our community had no knowledge of the grant application until an article appeared in the August 29 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Page 75 of the filed application Exhibit 14 states, “A resolution confirming the request of funds from the Department of Community and Economic Development for $3 million to be used for the Oakland Connector project will be adopted by the URA board at its next meeting on (August 13) and submitted shortly afterwards.” This exhibit suggests absolute certainty that the fund request would be adopted and submitted, indicating an intentional lack of community discussion on the matter. Who wrote this exhibit?

7) The five members of the URA Board of Directors ratified the grant application on August 13. An email from the URA’s Chief Communications Officer said that this was the only meeting on the topic. Was this meeting the first time these five members saw the application? Were any of them in attendance at meetings about the application prior to August 13? Who gave assurances to the board members that the University of Pittsburgh was involved in discussions about the proposed roadway?

8) Council President Bruce Kraus was asked on September 23 to provide our community a copy of the grant application, but he declined to do so. Councilman Corey O’Connor stated on October 20 that he asked the Urban Redevelopment Authority for the grant application but the authority did not give it to him. Why were our councilmen not given access to the application?

9) How many meetings did Mayor William Peduto attend and with whom concerning the grant application or a proposed roadway corridor through city-owned property in Panther Hollow to connect Oakland to the Almono site in Hazelwood? Who did he meet with at the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University?

10) The minutes for the ratification of the grant application on August 13 read, “Mr. Acklin stated he has started to attend the partner meetings on behalf of the city with RIDC.” How many meetings did the city’s chief of staff attend with officials of the Regional Industrial Development Corporation? Where did the meetings occur? Are there minutes of the meetings? How extensive was his involvement with the writing of the grant application? Who did he meet with at the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University? Who else did he meet with this year concerning the roadway corridor?

11) On Page 72 of the filed application Exhibit 9 is a letter of support from Director of City Planning Raymond Gastil expressing support for the application. How many meetings did he have and with whom concerning the application and proposed roadway?

12) The Almono site is owned by four of the largest foundations in Pittsburgh. What involvement did President Grant Oliphant of the Heinz Endowment have concerning the writing of the grant application? Did he approve the application? How many meetings did he attend and who did he meet with concerning the proposed roadway? These questions could also be asked of Trustee William Pat Getty of the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation, and leaders at the Richard King Mellon Foundation and the McCune Foundation.

13) How much money has the city already spent regarding the grant application and the proposed roadway corridor? Does the City Controller have reason to conduct his own investigation? Have federal funds been allocated and spent concerning the grant application and roadway corridor?

14) The state has given millions of dollars for the Almono site development. Have state funds been spent concerning the grant application and the proposed roadway? Does the State Auditor General have reason to conduct his own investigation?

Community efforts will continue until the $3 million Multimodal Grant application is either rescinded by city officials and/or the Urban Redevelopment Authority, or rejected at a scheduled hearing by the Commonwealth Financing Authority. We take these actions not only for the living longtime residents of Panther Hollow, but also for the blessed dead longtime residents who built, protected, and preserved this iconic neighborhood.

Lack of Integrity In Government

Pittsburgh City Council
Public Comments
October 20, 2015

Lack of Integrity in Government

For the past eight years I have spoken before this legislative body of the suffering of the longtime residents of Panther Hollow and Oakland because of the University of Pittsburgh’s never-ending expansion. While Pitt has severely impacted South Oakland, Carnegie Mellon University has been doing the same to North Oakland. I repeatedly asked that this council and the city’s executive branch have compassion for the residents, and have insisted that human dignity must be the highest priority of the universities and our government. My words went unheeded.

Our focus now is on the judicial branch of government to give our community the justice we deserve.

On July 31, the Urban Redevelopment Authority filed an application with the State Department of Community and Economic Development for a $3 million Multimodal Transportation Fund grant. The purpose of that grant, according to the application, was to build a roadway from Neville Street through Panther Hollow continuing on to the Almono site in Hazelwood. This plan would destroy Panther Hollow, one of Pittsburgh’s first Italian neighborhoods.

The application was filed fraudulently.

The application states: “This project will be a public-private partnership between the City of Pittsburgh, the Urban Redevelopment Authority, the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University. The land for this project is owned by the City of Pittsburgh. The Urban Redevelopment Authority will execute the construction of the project and the operator of the shuttle will be a shared entity that includes the universities and large employers.”

A University of Pittsburgh vice chancellor emailed me on October 2: “The University has not been involved in any discussions about the proposed roadway. We first learned of the URA’s application to the Commonwealth for funding when the article appeared in the Post-Gazette several weeks ago.”

This assertion contradicts the grant application.

Although the application was filed on July 31, it was not ratified by the URA until August 13. No meetings took place other than for the ratification. Our first public notification was in the Post-Gazette article of August 29.

No council members have spoken up for the Panther Hollow community, or even acknowledged the possible effects it would feel from this project. Twelve city officials have not responded to letters requesting additional information about this project.

Integrity in government is not a window to open when the cameras are rolling and to close when the cameras are off. It is a window that must remain open.

City officials must break their silence and respond to our letters. We ask that they abide by this spirit-freeing principle – be honest, even if it is not in your best interest.

Carlino Giampolo

Brian O’Neill: Residents fear impact of a techie transit link

Panther Hollow Lake in Schenley Park
Panther Hollow Lake in Schenley Park – Darrell Sapp/Post-Gazette

Brian O’Neill: Residents fear impact of a techie transit link

October 11, 2015
By Brian O’Neill / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Panther Hollow is a quiet, hear-the-birds-chirp kind of neighborhood in the heart of the city, and its most outspoken resident wants to make sure it doesn’t go from bucolic to bus thoroughfare overnight.

Carlino Giampolo, 69, a semi-regular at City Council meetings, grew up in a house at the end of Boundary Street. As a boy, he was surrounded by 250 neighbors who could all trace their lineage to two villages in Italy’s mountainous Abruzzi region.

His parents’ generation of homeowners is nearly all gone or widowed, but this valley in Central Oakland remains sacred ground to Mr. Giampolo and others. We sat at a neighborhood picnic table striped in the green, white and red of the Italian flag as he unloaded his concerns about a proposed transit link between the nearby universities and the billion-dollar development planned for the Hazelwood Flats.

Those rubber-tire shuttles would have to come through Panther Hollow.

Tommy D’Andrea, 42, a city firefighter and Democratic committeeman, lives about a quarter-mile south. He says the residents of his stretch of Greenfield popularly known as “The Run’’ also don’t want the $7.2 million roadway through their quiet neighborhood.

What these men also don’t like is finding out about it in the newspaper.

Now, given that there’s already a rail line carrying at least eight trains a day through the hollow, there ought to be a way to do this without high impact on Panther Hollow. The worst-case scenario was taken off the picnic table for Mr. Giampolo when I relayed the assertion by Kevin Acklin, Mayor Bill Peduto’s chief of staff, that the shuttle could use city right-of-way on either side of the railroad on the hill and not run through the grassy area where we sat.

But Mr. Giampolo said he’ll stand with M. D’Andrea and the people of ”The Run’’ — officially Four Mile Run — to make sure that neighborhood isn’t hurt either.

Again, with the railroad skirting the western boundary of The Run, there should be a way to satisfy the neighborhood and still link university brainiacs to the development in Hazelwood. That 178-acre Almono site, owned by four Pittsburgh foundations, is where an LTV steel plant once stood. The tech boom has sent rents soaring in Oakland, so easily accessed offices just a bit farther south should do well. This new wrinkle in public transit could also benefit the communities now wary of it.

But no one can blame these longtime residents for feeling incidental, not integral, to the city’s plans. Mr. Acklin, who also chairs the Urban Redevelopment Authority, said the transit announcement came before there were any neighborhood meetings because the URA needed to meet a deadline to apply for a $3 million state grant.

Neighborhood meetings will come before the year is out, he said. Meantime, the city is still fleshing out the details for this project that could break ground in June.

Officials should expect an earful when those meetings commence.

Mr. D’Andrea said at least one street in his neighborhood hasn’t been paved in 30 years, flood issues have lingered unaddressed and vacant, blighted homes still stand. The answer from city hall is always a lack of money.

“We get no love,’’ he says. So it irked him to pick up his Post-Gazette and read that the city is suddenly moving at warp speed to devote $7.2 million to “basically coddle tax-free entities.’’

When those entities spin off private-sector jobs in the city, that’s good for Pittsburgh. Taking cars out of Oakland also is a good idea — as long as commuters’ cars aren’t simply transferred to residential neighborhoods such as The Run. Those are the nittty-gritty details that are best figured out at street level by the people who have been living on them for decades.

Mr. Giampolo loves his Panther Hollow neighborhood so much his other home in Honolulu can’t hold him. He says, “I’m pretty much here until we get this resolved.’’ A longtime critic of the universities for not addressing the problems students cause in the old neighborhoods, he’s focused on this single issue now.

“He’ll have a seat at the table,’’ Mr. Acklin promised,”but he doesn’t run the table.’’

The grant application was accelerated to meet a deadline, but there should be plenty of time to tinker. The city’s asking for money from a state that doesn’t even have a budget yet.

Brian O’Neill: boneill@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1947.

http://www.post-gazette.com/opinion/brian-oneill/2015/10/11/Brian-O-Neill-Residents-fear-impact-of-a-techie-transit-link/stories/201510110120

Protecting Panther Hollow

Panther Hollow
Panther Hollow, by Jeff Ahearn | Assistant Visual Editor, The Pitt News

Protecting Panther Hollow

The Pitt News / Mark Pesto and Elaina Zachos / Senior Staff Writers / October 9, 2015
http://pittnews.com/63891/news/protecting-panther-hollow/

Carlino Giampolo, the unofficial mayor of Oakland, has loved his community for more than thirty years, which is why he’s fighting the city’s most recent expansion project and pledging to “Save Panther Hollow.”

Giampolo has long campaigned against the University for the preservation of his community in Panther Hollow, a tiny neighborhood which lies along Boundary Street in the Junction Hollow valley below Oakland.

Now, he wants to raise awareness for another campaign against a proposed transportation corridor through Junction Hollow and the Panther Hollow neighborhood.

That road would connect Oakland and its universities to Almono, a former steel mill site in Hazelwood, along the Monongahela River. A coalition of Pittsburgh foundations and nonprofits plan to redevelop Almono into a prime destination for new housing and office space.

According to preliminary plans, if the city builds this transit link, it will run along South Neville Street in Oakland, down from its intersection with Forbes Avenue at South Neville Street, and onto Boundary Street through Panther Hollow. It would continue onto a proposed road along the existing bike trail through Panther Hollow before reconnecting with Boundary Street as it enters Greenfield.

“Connecting the [Almono] site to the rest of the community is a priority,” Katie O’Malley, a spokesperson for Mayor William Peduto, wrote in an e-mail.

But Giampolo worries that Boundary Street becoming part of this corridor could destroy the tight-knit Panther Hollow community. Although he initially agreed to an interview, he later declined as he wanted to develop his campaign further before talking with The Pitt News. The Pitt News called him two more times and spoke to him at his home, but Giampolo still declined to comment.

However, Giampolo has publicized his concerns in blog entries on the Save Panther Hollow website.

The project’s announcement “created anxiety, fear and dread, especially for the elderly residents” of Panther Hollow, Giampolo wrote in a blog post on Sept. 24.

“We fully intend to triumph over this proposed roadway,” Giampolo wrote in the post, “and we will do so in a manner in which we uphold our ideals, principles, self-respect and dignity.”

Save Panther Hollow isn’t the first site on which Giampolo has expressed his views on issues within Oakland. On the Oakland Dignity site, he has published numerous essays and open letters about Pitt’s expansion into Oakland, which he considers destructive to the community of permanent residents, and about student-caused problems like noise and litter.

“For far too long, community organizations have allowed the University of Pittsburgh to dictate how residents of the community were able to live,” Giampolo wrote in a December 2013 post on Oakland Dignity.

Paul Supowitz, the vice chancellor for community and governmental relations at Pitt, said he’s familiar with Giampolo’s concerns.

Supowitz said litter is still a problem. Although he said community initiatives like Keep it Clean, Oakland! — a collaborative project with the Oakland Planning and Development Corporation in which students, residents and business owners adopt blocks and keep them litter-free — have improved the situation.

“I do not think we’re satisfied, especially on the litter front,” Supowitz said.

As for the other student-caused problems, Pat Corelli, Student Government Board’s governmental relations committee chair, said he doesn’t think Giampolo’s complaints pertain to most students living in the Oakland community.

“The vast majority of students living off campus are responsible,” Corelli said.

Still, Corelli said there’s not much of a relationship between students and Oakland’s permanent residents. According to Corelli, many students don’t bother getting to know residents, who, in turn, often consider students to be nuisances.

“I think a lot of students have come to the conclusion that we should have more of a sense of community,” Corelli said.

To help build that sense of community, Supowitz said, Pitt issues the Student Guide to Campus Life, a document meant to make students understand they’re not the only ones in South Oakland and that they have responsibilities as community members.

Supowitz also said recent Pitt “block parties” — where students and permanent residents meet — have gotten them to talk to each other and address problems as they appear.

According to Supowitz, he and Pitt try to respond to Oakland residents’ concerns. He said his office has monthly meetings with community groups like the Oakland Planning and Development Corporation, Peoples Oakland and the Oakland Business Improvement District. Although he can’t deny that Giampolo is passionate, Supowitz said Giampolo might have the wrong approach to some local problems. Giampolo doesn’t want to work with established community groups, preferring to act on his own, Supowitz said.

“He’s a person with his head in the right place, but he makes it difficult to work with him because of the way he goes about things,” Supowitz said.

Along with his outspoken activism, Giampolo’s deep history in Oakland make him a figurehead in the community.

The 68-year-old resident has lived in the area for his entire life. He attended Central Catholic High School and graduated from Duquesne University around 1970.

Family members say Giampolo is proud of his neighborhood, which sits relatively unseen at the bottom of Joncaire Street in South Oakland. Italian immigrants from the towns of Pizzoferrato and Gamberale settled into the neighborhood in the late 1800s. Most of those families, including Giampolo’s, still live in that area today.

Giampolo lives catty-corner to his extended family. He also lives across the street from a friend that he’s known for 40 years.

“Down here, it’s a handshake,” said George Casciato, Giampolo’s distant cousin. “In the rest of the world, you have to have contracts.”

A small patch of grass sits in the crook of Boundary Street, the main road through Panther Hollow. Picnic tables striped with red, white and green represent the neighborhood’s Italian pride. The community planted two trees in remembrance of Giampolo’s father, Carl Sr., and his uncle, Bob.

A small plaque under a white arbor in the parklet lists the surnames of the families who first settled in the area. “Giampolo” is sandwiched between a slew of other Italian names.

Anna Casciato, Giampolo’s aunt, said her nephew wears his Italian heritage “like a banner.”

Giampolo works to keep the community clean. He uses his own money to beautify the area, Anna Casciato said, cleaning up the hillside and planting flowers.

Pitt administrators have also noticed Giampolo’s dedication to keeping Panther Hollow clean. While discussing litter problems in Oakland, Supowitz singled out Boundary Street as a particularly “pristine” area.

George Casciato said his cousin fights for the people in the community. He works to inform his neighbors of what’s going on in Oakland and fights for the surrounding community to respect the native residents in Panther Hollow.

“This is our town,” George Casciato said. “He fought, and has been fighting that forever.”

Anna Casciato also testified to Giampolo’s work ethic.

“He wants to do it all the right way and he never gives up,” she said. “He’s someone who gets an idea and he sticks with it.”

Whether he’s fighting for his community or dancing across the country, family and friends say Giampolo always keeps moving.

“I don’t know if he has spare time,” George Casciato said.

And the city assures that it cares about the people living in the communities that the Almono project might affect, should it come to fruition.

The Urban Redevelopment Authority board of directors recently ratified an application to the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development for a $3 million grant to design the link, according to an Oct. 5 post on Save Panther Hollow.

Although the project is still in the planning stages, O’Malley said any plans for an Oakland-Almono transportation corridor would engage the community.

“Mayor Peduto and Chief of Staff Kevin Acklin care a great deal about the effects that projects have on a community,” O’Malley wrote in an email. “If and when the transportation corridor project comes to light, community stakeholders will be at the table and community feedback will be vital to the process.

The Pitt News / Mark Pesto and Elaina Zachos / Senior Staff Writers / October 9, 2015
http://pittnews.com/63891/news/protecting-panther-hollow/

Urban Redevelopment Authority Board Minutes

Urban Redevelopment Authority
Board of Directors Meeting
August 13, 2015


Below are the minutes for the August 13 meeting. Although the minutes indicate that the application for the (up to) $3 million Multimodal Transportation Fund Grant was ratified at this meeting, there were no prior meetings to either discuss or authorize the grant. This fact was verified by the URA’s Chief Communications Officer, who stated that the August 13 meeting was the only one at which the grant application was discussed.

When supporters of Panther Hollow began calling Mayor William Peduto and Councilman Bruce Kraus to protest this roadway, they were told the grant in question is merely for conducting a study. The minutes contradict this, stating that it is a grant “that would go towards design and construction of a roadway.”

The grant application was ratified on August 13, but the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development received the grant application on July 31. This was the last date an application could be submitted to guarantee a ruling on November 10. If it had been submitted the following day, a ruling would not be made until November of next year. After numerous attempts, the Panther Hollow community finally received the grant application on October 8.


  1.  Economic Development

  a.  Oakland —Junction Hollow Multimodal Grant Application:

  1. Ratification to file application for a Multimodal Transportation Fund Grant application and to enter into a Contract with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) and/or the Commonwealth Financing Authority (CFA) for Junction Hollow Project, in the amount not to exceed $3,000,000.00.

Mr. Cummings requested that the Members approve the above item.

Mr. Cummings stated that authorization is requested to approve the above actions with Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) and/or the Commonwealth Financing Authority (CFA) for a grant that would go towards design and construction of a roadway through Junction Hollow. This roadway would exclusively be for shuttles connecting Oakland to Hazelwood, the Almono site, and the Pittsburgh Technology Center. The grant would also reconfigure the current bike path through the hollow and possibly add a bike/pedestrian bridge to Schenley Park.

The benefits of this potential connection include: improved transit connection between Oakland and Hazelwood, better bike infrastructure to connect through the hollow and into Schenley Park, direct connection between the Almono site and CMU/Pitt, and the ability to take the existing PTC-Oakland shuttle off the crowded Bates Street corridor and onto a faster alignment. The project is currently going through a feasibly analysis by the Studio for Spatial Practice & Trans Associates (and paid for by RIDC). Future phases could include the switch to an automated vehicle and/or the connection down Neville Street to the MLK Busway.

Principal:
Donald F. Smith, Jr. PhD
President
RIDC
210 Sixth Avenue, Suite 3620
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
Phone 412-315-6444

Mr. Nathan Strum of RIDC was present.

Mr. Acklin stated he has started to attend the partner meetings on behalf of the city with RIDC, and that one of the challenges of the site has been the difficulty of access and connection through Oakland. Mr. Ferlo stated it is a great project and that the problem with the lower areas has always been connectivity issues.

Upon motion made by Mr. Ferlo, seconded by Mr. Gainey, and unanimously carried, the following resolution was adopted:

RESOLUTION NO. 248 (2015)

RESOLVED: That the action Of the Chairman, Vice Chairman, Executive Director, Acting Executive Director or Director of Finance, on behalf of the Authority, in filing for a Multimodal Transportation Fund Grant application with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) and/or the Commonwealth Financing Authority (CFA) for Junction Hollow Project, in the amount not to exceed $3,000,000.00, and to be used to improve transit connection between Oakland and Hazelwood, better bike infrastructure to connect through the hollow and into Schenley Park, direct connection between the Almono site and CMU/Pitt, and the ability to take the existing PTC-Oakland shuttle off the crowded Bates Street corridor and onto a faster alignment, and to execute any other assurances or requirements necessary in connection with said Application, is hereby ratified, and that the action of the Secretary or Assistant Secretary in attesting same and affixing the seal of the Authority thereto, is hereby ratified; and

RESOLVED FURTHER: That the Chairman, Vice Chairman, Executive Director, Acting Executive Director or Director of Finance, on behalf of the Authority, is hereby authorized to execute a Contract with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) and/or the Commonwealth Financing Authority (CFA) not to exceed $3,000,000.00, to be used to improve transit connection between Oakland and Hazelwood, better bike infrastructure to connect through the hollow and into Schenley Park, direct connection between the Almono site and CMU/Pitt, and the ability to take the existing PTC-Oakland shuttle off the crowded Bates Street corridor and onto a faster alignment, and to execute any other assurances or requirements necessary in connection with said Contract, and the Secretary or Assistant Secretary is authorized and directed to attest same and affix the seal of the Authority thereto.